Course Descriptions and Numbers

The information on this page has been updated for the 2018-19 school year. Please see the 2017-18 course description catalog for this school year.

Required Courses

Fundamentals of Writing (NCAA, RAI)
ENG213 or ENG214
(Required 10-11-12) First OR Second Semester
Prerequisites: Both semesters of Language and Literature. Students who score in the 98th percentile (National Percentile Rank) of the Iowa Assessment on Reading Comprehension and who earn an “A” in their first semester of Language and Literature may opt out of this course. Students opting out of this course should take Advanced Composition, Intermediate Writing, or Creative Writing.

This is a one-semester course designed to teach basic composition. Fundamentals of Writing includes expository, persuasive, and literary analysis essays with enrichment in grammar, vocabulary, and writing process skills. To earn credit, students must demonstrate proficiency in three district assessments: 1) Reading for Information, 2) Literary Analysis, and 3) Reading Response.

Fundamentals of Writing (Blended Instruction)(NCAA, RAI)
ENG901 or ENG902
(Required 10-11-12) First OR Second Semester
Prerequisites: Both semesters of Language and Literature. Students who score in the 98th percentile (National Percentile Rank) of the Iowa Assessment on Reading Comprehension and who earn an “A” in their first semester of Language and Literature may opt out of this course. Students opting out of this course should take Advanced Composition, Intermediate Writing, or Creative Writing.

This is a one-semester course designed to teach basic composition. Fundamentals of Writing includes expository, persuasive, and literary analysis essays with enrichment in grammar, vocabulary and writing process skills. To earn credit, students must demonstrate proficiency on three district assessments: 1) Reading for Information, 2) Literary Analysis, and 3) Reading Response. The course will be set-up in a fashion that requires the student to receive the delivery of instruction in the classroom and through a digital online media.

Speech Communication (NCAA, RAI)
ENG107 or ENG108
(Required 10-11-12) First OR Second Semester

Speech Communication is a one-semester required course designed to improve effectiveness of verbal and non-verbal communication. Concepts and activities include the development of interpersonal skills, intrapersonal awareness, organizational skills, and delivery skills for public speaking. Students will research topics of their choice using online databases and other web resources. They will utilize presentation software and other audio/visual digital resources. Students will use technology to record and reflect upon their presentations. They will engage in group processing and discussions, as well as other activities to enhance listening and overall communication skills for application to real life situations.

Speech/Composition (NCAA, RAI)
ENG221 and ENG222(Required 10) Full-Year Course
Prerequisite: Both semesters of Language and Literature or test-out.

Students who feel the personalized environment of a full-year course would be beneficial to them are encouraged to register for this course, which fulfills both the Speech Communication and Fundamentals of Writing requirements. This full-year course is an integration of Speech Communication and Fundamentals of Writing with focus on both written persuasive essays and literary analysis with enrichment in grammar, vocabulary, and writing process skills. Speech communication concepts and activities include the development of interpersonal awareness and the organizational and delivery skills for public speaking. Students will research topics of their choice using online databases and other web resources. They will utilize presentation software and other audio/visual digital resources. Students will engage in group processing and discussions, as well as other activities to enhance listening and overall communication skills for application to real life situations. To earn credit, students must demonstrate proficiency on three district assessments: 1) Reading for Information, 2) Literary Analysis, and 3) Reading Response.

Literature Electives

Advanced Contemporary Literature (NCAA, RAI)
ENG331 or ENG332
(Elective 10-11-12) First OR Second Semester
Prerequisites: Language and Literature or test-out 

This one-semester course is designed for students interested in exploring literature based upon contemporary issues, themes, and artists. This is an aggressive literature class designed to expand on student’s established literary knowledge. Students who enjoy reading or who are preparing for an AP class in Language Arts would benefit from this course. Fiction, nonfiction, plays, film, and poetry will be studied in depth to provide understanding of contemporary issues and artists of varying background in preparation for college-level study of literature. To this end, the literature in this course may contain mature language and themes. Students will read four to six full-length texts throughout the semester.

Advanced World Literature (NCAA, RAI)
ENG327 or ENG328
(Elective 10-11-12) First OR Second Semester
Prerequisite: Language and Literature or test-out

A one-semester course offers students a survey of literature from a variety of countries – excluding America and Britain – from a variety of time periods. Selections will represent a number of different genres and will be organized around thematic concepts. Some writers that may be studied include Wiesel, Hesse, Neruda, Petrarch, Ibsen, and many others. An important objective of the class is to learn about other cultures. Students will also deepen their understanding of literary genres and literary conventions.

AP Literature and Composition (DMACC, NCAA, RAI)
ENG503 and ENG504
(Elective 11-12) Full-Year Course
Prerequisite: Advanced Composition and one of the following literature courses: Early or Modern American Literature, Early or Modern British Literature, Shakespeare, American Heritage, World Literature, or Advanced Contemporary Literature

AP Literature and Composition is designed to develop critical analysis abilities through the reading and study of short fiction, plays, novels, and poetry. Readings for class will reflect both classic and contemporary authors and may include up to nine full-length novels and plays, and include a summer reading assignment. Students will prepare for the spring Advanced Placement exam.

The course is time intensive and requires excellent active reading and writing abilities. Students are expected to have mastered the basics of composition before entering the course. Development of literary term usage, insightful reading for in-class discussion, and construction of mature, analytical essays will be stressed. Taking the Advanced Placement exam is the culmination of the AP course curriculum. Those students not writing the AP exam will have the course designated “Accelerated Literature and Composition” on their transcript, and their grade will not be weighted. Both semesters of a yearlong course, plus writing the AP exam, are required for a weighted grade.This course must be taken for DMACC credit.
Each exam has a cost that will be incurred by the student.  If students are in need of financial assistance to help with the cost of AP exams, please see your assigned counselor for information.

American Heritage (NCAA, RAI)
SOC307 and SOC308
(Elective 11-12) Full-Year Course
Prerequisites: Fundamentals of Writing or test-out 

This interdisciplinary course integrates history, literature, and writing in an exploration of important literacy trends and themes in early and modern American literature, especially as it relates to cultural and historical events from the 17th Century forward. In this yearlong course, students will earn four (4) credits: one for each semester of U.S. History, one Modern American Literature credit, and one Intermediate Writing credit. See those course descriptions for more details regarding curricular topics.

This course, taught by one social studies teacher and one language arts teacher, meets daily for two periods (or one block period). This reading intensive and project-based course will emphasize group interaction, research projects and field trips to explore real world connections.Students interested in working with others on group projects are well suited for the interactive and exploratory nature of this class. Because students in this course work with the same peers and teachers for both semesters, they will form deeper relationships with each other than often happens in shorter courses. Please note: students previously enrolled in Intermediate Writing or either Early American Literature or Modern American Literature are not eligible. Additionally, students who complete this course should not schedule another semester of Early American Literature or Modern American Literature or Intermediate Writing. There may be limited availability to register for this course.

Dramatic Literature (NCAA, RAI)
ENG304
(Elective 10-11-12) Second Semester
Prerequisite: Language and Literature or test-out

This one-semester course gives students an opportunity to study the structure of drama. They will read plays written by playwrights from the Greek era to the present. Playwrights to be studied include Sophocles, Shakespeare, Moliere, Chekov, Miller, and Wilson. An overview of the historical background of these different periods will be given, and students will learn some of the characteristics that give certain plays a “universal” quality. This course may be taken to fulfill the one-credit literature requirement for graduation.

Early American Literature (NCAA, RAI)
ENG315
(Elective 10-11-12) First Semester
Prerequisite: Language and Literature or test-out

This one-semester course explores the major American literary movements through the 19th century. Students will make connections between literature and history. The course emphasizes the relationships among the literature, culture, values, and historical events of the time period. After an overview of the Pre-Colonial, Colonial, and Revolutionary foundations, the course will focus on the major literary movements of the 19th century: Romanticism, Transcendentalism, and Realism. Some of the authors studied in this course include Edgar Allen Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Emily Dickinson, Walt Whitman, and Mark Twain.

Early British Literature (to 1800) (NCAA, RAI)
ENG317
(Elective 10-11-12) First Semester
Prerequisite: Language and Literature or test-out

This one-semester course is designed to give students an overview of British Literature from the Celtic oral traditions and the great Anglo-Saxon epics through Arthurian legend, Shakespeare, and the end of the Renaissance, in addition to an overview of the development of the English language. Students will read a variety of genres – several forms of poetry, drama, essay, and the medieval romance – and become familiar with a variety of reading techniques to both comprehend and interpret the literature they encounter. Authors and works covered may include: Celtic mythology, Beowulf, ballads, Chaucer and The Canterbury Tales, Sir Gawaine and the Green Knight, Le Morte d’Arthur, Shakespeare’s sonnets and a play, the carpe diem poets, Edmund Spenser, Paradise Lost, and John Donne

Independent Literature Survey (NCAA, RAI)
ENG321 or ENG322
(Elective 10-11-12) First OR Second Semester
Prerequisites: Language and Literature or test-out 

This one-semester course is designed for students who are interested in choosing their own books and reading at their own pace. Students will be encouraged to find enjoyment in reading as well as to challenge themselves to read books outside their comfort zones. Students will write reviews of books they read and discuss literary concepts through conferences with the teacher. The course will emphasize a variety of reading strategies that will help students to improve their comprehension of both personal and academic reading. Ultimately, the course will encourage students to develop the skills and habits of lifelong readers who choose to read and enjoy books as adults.

Modern American Literature (NCAA, RAI)
ENG323 or ENG324
(Elective 10-11-12) First OR Second Semester
Prerequisite: Language and Literature or test-out

This is a one-semester course, which presents the important American authors of the 20th century. Students will read novels, short stories, plays, poems, and essays representing the many cultural and ethnic groups in the United States. Students will make connections between American history and the literature of the times. Emphasis will be placed on the relevancy of the literature to contemporary times. Some of the authors studied include Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Hughes, and Chopin.

Modern British Literature (since 1800) (NCAA, RAI)
ENG318
(Elective 10-11-12) Second Semester
Prerequisite: Language and Literature or test-out

This one-semester course is designed to give students an overview of British Literature from the English Civil War through the Restoration, the Age of Reason, the Romantic Period, Victorian England, and the Modern Era of the 20th Century so students can see how Britain’s history and literature fit into the fabric of European and world history. Students will become familiar with a variety of genres, including the use of satire, several forms of poetry, journalism, and the novel. Authors covered may include Swift, Pope, Defoe, Pepys, Johnson, Joyce, Thomas, and others.

Reading Resource
ENG101 or ENG102
(Elective 10-11-12) First OR Second Semester

The purpose of this class is to provide students with additional time to read and develop reading skills and strategies necessary to meet grade-level reading standards. Enrollment is based on test scores and teacher and teacher recommendations. Administrators, counselors, and reading teachers will use the following criteria to determine which students should be placed in Reading Resource:

  1. Use Scholastic Reading Inventory screener (score in the below basic range)
  2. A pattern of scoring below proficient on state assessments (standard scores consistently in the non-proficient range)
  3. Teacher Recommendation form
  4. Review of English Language Proficiency scores for English Learners.

Students will receive further diagnostic testing to determine which core standards need additional instruction. Instruction will be tailored to student need in literacy standards for comprehension and language.If administrators, counselors, and reading teachers determine that a student has been inappropriately placed in Reading Resource, the student will be removed from the course.

Shakespeare (NCAA, RAI)
ENG319 or ENG320
(Elective 10-11-12) First OR Second Semester
Prerequisite: Language and Literature or test-out

This one-semester course begins with a study of the life of William Shakespeare and the culture of Elizabethan England. Students will read a selection of Shakespeare’s sonnets and at least three of his plays, including one tragedy and one comedy. An important objective is to have students understand Shakespeare’s plays in the context of his theater and time. Students will also learn to understand Shakespeare’s language, to interpret his metaphors, to recognize famous quotations from his work, and to use some literary terms.

Speech Electives

Advanced Speech Communication (DMACC, NCAA, RAI)
ENG201 or ENG202
(Elective 10-11-12) First OR Second Semester
Prerequisite: Speech Communication or Speech/Composition

Advanced Speech Communication is a one-semester course designed to further students’ verbal and nonverbal communication expertise in real life situations. Students will research topics of their choice using online databases and other web resources. They will utilize presentation software and other audio/visual digital resources. Students will use technology to record and reflect upon their presentations.

Students develop skills for effective problem-solving, group processing, leadership, storytelling, and television performance. Creative and critical thinking are an integral part of all Advanced Speech Communication activities. The skills emphasized in this course are important in the workplace. This course must be taken for DMACC credit.

Broadcasting Lab
ENG210
(Elective 10-11-12) Second Semester
Prerequisite: Introduction to Broadcasting

This one-semester professional-based lab course focuses further on radio production, management, programming, and sales with additional on-air script writing and reporting. Students will develop programming that requires them to spend at least one hour per week on KWDM. Students will be able to further differentiate their learning experience by choosing a track to follow in the course with various deadlines and production, on-air, and scripting requirements. All students will be required to learn sales and marketing for KWDM.

Interested students may take this course multiple times in order to expand their knowledge of broadcasting production, management, and programming, as well as build the level of expertise needed to possibly work with other departments and assist with school, district, and community media needs. Students will be encouraged to change the track focus when taking the course an additional time.

Debate I/Public Speaking (NCAA, RAI)
ENG601 and ENG602
(Elective 10-11-12) Full-Year Course

In this yearlong course, each student will develop debate and public speaking skills. Debate will include research, preparation, presentation, and evaluation of policy debate, Lincoln-Douglas debate, public forum, and legislative debate. Students will use online research tools and subscription services such as Lexis-Nexis and JSTOR. Public speaking will include oratorical and extemporaneous speaking and interpretation of literature. Students will be required to participate in cocurricular activities beyond the school day.

Requiring advanced reading comprehension and analytical skills, this rigorous course is intended for self-motivated students who can work both cooperatively and independently. This course fulfills the Speech graduation requirement.

A debate course is required for all debate team members, and all members of the class will participate on the debate team. Students will be required to participate in a minimum of ten rounds of competitive debate per semester. This requirement can be met at two local competitions per semester. There will be no cost to the students at these local competitions.

Debate II (NCAA, RAI)
ENG603 and ENG604
(Elective 10-11-12) Full-Year Course
Prerequisite: Debate I/Public Speaking 

This yearlong course is designed to give students additional debate experience. Students will read critically and evaluate evidence in preparation for presentations. Examination of philosophy, fallacies in reasoning, and organization will be a significant component of the course. Students will engage in academic research, advanced writing, and speaking skills. Students will continue to use online research tools and subscription services such as Lexis-Nexis and JSTOR. A debate course is required for all debate team members, and all members of the class will participate on the debate team.

Drama I: Acting
ENG203 or ENG204
(Elective 10-11-12) First or Second Semester

Acting is a one-semester course that improves students’ abilities in the theater arts and performing. The course encourages the development of self and group awareness. It emphasizes body control, voice development, improvisation, and character analysis. In addition, mime and movement, ensemble building, and audition techniques are studied. It concludes with the production of scenes from plays. This course satisfies the fine arts requirement for graduation or may be used as an English elective.

Drama II: Advanced Acting
ENG211 or 212
(Elective 10-11-12) First or Second Semester
Prerequisite: Drama I: Acting

Advanced Acting is a one-semester course that improves students’ abilities in the theatre arts and performing. The course encourages the development of self and group awareness. It emphasizes advanced movement theories, in-depth vocal training, period styles, college auditioning techniques, and musical theatre. In addition, students will study historical acting periods. It concludes with the production of scenes from plays. This course satisfies the fine arts requirement for graduation or may be used as an English elective.

Introduction to Broadcasting (IWCC)
ENG207 or ENG208
(Elective 10-11-12) First OR Second Semester

This one-semester professional-based course involves students in producing programming for broadcast on KWDM, Valley’s radio station. Students learn radio history, target markets, FCC rules and regulations, as well as approaches to the various announcing styles. There is a focus on on-air technique, including vocal development and technology equipment use. Students will also script and produce pre-recorded materials, such as promotions, public service announcements, and news summaries.Classroom discussions and projects pertain to programming and broadcasting, target audience, announcing for the situation, commercial analysis, vocal analysis, interviewing, radio station formatting, and radio technology. This course must be taken for Iowa Western Community College. Iowa Western Community College requires a one-time application and a $35 enrollment fee, to the Iowa Western Records and Registration Office.

Writing Electives

Advanced Composition (NCAA, RAI)
ENG403 or ENG404
(Elective 10-11-12) First OR Second Semester
Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Writing or test-out

Advanced Composition is a one-semester course intended to prepare students for Advanced Placement English in high school or for freshman English in college. The course is organized around writing three genres of nonfiction writing: expository essays, scholarly research writing, and literary analysis of a serious nonfiction book. The project of writing scholarly research will stress the steps of serious academic writing.

Correctness of expression and vocabulary study will be emphasized. In a regular sequence of courses, the student who performs well in Fundamentals of Writing can progress through Advanced Composition without difficulties. The average student in Fundamentals is advised to take Intermediate Writing before Advanced Composition. The strongest English students may progress through Advanced Composition into AP Language and Composition or AP Literature and Composition.

Advanced Creative Writing (DMACC, NCAA)
ENG405 or ENG406
(Elective 10-11-12) First OR Second Semester
Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Writing and Creative Writing I

This course is designed for self-motivated students interested in deepening their understanding of creative writing. The focus of the course centers on four objectives: writing, reading, publication, and literacy. The course will be offered to students who have successfully completed Creative Writing. Students will be adding to the portfolios they assembled in Creative Writing by working in fiction, poetry, or nonfiction. The course will involve extensive work-shopping, revision, and reflection. This course must be taken for DMACC credit.

Advanced Publications Concepts
ENG407 and ENG408
(Elective 11-12) Full-Year Course
Prerequisite: Two semesters of Publications: Newspaper or Publications: Yearbook

Students will participate in publications as editors and perform all editorial functions: section planning, assigning, designing, researching, writing, editing, pre-press production, and publication evaluation. This course, which cannot be used as the required writing unit for graduation, should be taken only by those students who have previously taken two semesters of publication course work.

American Heritage (NCAA)
SOC307 and SOC308
(Elective 11-12) Full-Year Course
Prerequisites: Fundamentals of Writing or test-out 

This interdisciplinary course integrates history, literature, and writing in an exploration of important literacy trends and themes in early and modern American literature, especially as it relates to cultural and historical events from the 17th Century forward. In this yearlong course, students will earn four (4) credits: one for each semester of U.S. History, one Modern American Literature credit, and one Intermediate Writing credit. See those course descriptions for more details regarding curricular topics.

This course, taught by one social studies teacher and one language arts teacher, meets daily for two periods (or one block period). This reading intensive and project-based course will emphasize group interaction, research projects and field trips to explore real world connections.

Students interested in working with others on group projects are well suited for the interactive and exploratory nature of this class. Because students in this course work with the same peers and teachers for both semesters, they will form deeper relationships with each other than often happens in shorter courses.

Please note: students previously enrolled in Intermediate Writing or either Early American Literature or Modern American Literature are not eligible. Additionally, students who complete this course should not schedule another semester of Early American Literature or Modern American Literature or Intermediate Writing. There may be limited availability to register for this course.

AP Language and Composition (DMACC, NCAA, RAI)
ENG501 and ENG502
(Elective 11-12) Full-Year Course
Prerequisite: Advanced Composition and one of the following literature courses: Early or Modern American Literature, Early or Modern British Literature, Shakespeare, American Heritage, World Literature, or Advanced Contemporary Literature

AP Language and Composition is designed to develop critical analysis abilities through the reading and study of classic and contemporary nonfiction works, both textual and visual, as well as to develop the ability to compose prose directed to a specific audience. Students are expected to become more sensitive to the nuances of effective prose and literary style and to use more than one rhetorical strategy in a literary context. This course helps students enhance general discipline-specific vocabulary, improve writing style, and use rhetorical strategies. A summer reading assignment will review foundational skills, stress individual reading and analysis, and lay groundwork for the class. Throughout the year, students will keep a metacognitive journal highlighting their learning as well as their growth as a world citizen.

This course requires a time commitment above that of most high school English courses. Students will be required to have and use excellent active reading and writing abilities. The critiques will follow College Board expectations for college-level analysis. Taking the Advanced Placement exam is the culmination of the AP course curriculum. Therefore, students who choose not to take the AP exam will not have completed the course and will have the AP designation removed from their transcript. Accelerated Language and Composition will become the course designation for both semesters. This course both prepares students for the Advanced Placement exam as well as meets DMACC Composition course requirements. AP courses receive a weighted grade when students complete BOTH semesters and the AP exam. This course must be taken for DMACC credit.

Each exam has a cost that will be incurred by the student.  If students are in need of financial assistance to help with the cost of AP exams, please see your assigned counselor for information.

Creative Writing I (NCAA, RAI)
ENG401 or ENG402
(Elective 10-11-12) First OR Second Semester
Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Writing or Testout

This one-semester course is offered to help students develop their individual creativity and to appreciate that of other writers. The course includes a survey of various types of creative writing, a critical analysis of styles and methods, and practice in writing poetry and prose with special attention given to development of personal style. Students will reflect on the process behind their written pieces and a portfolio of selected writings is required of each student at the end of the course.

Intermediate Writing (NCAA, RAI)
ENG305 or ENG306
(Elective 10-11-12) First OR Second Semester
Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Writing or Test-out

This one-semester course will teach students how to develop strong academic essays, which will include a variety of genres and writing styles. Within this development, students will complete the writing process of prewriting, drafting, evaluating, revising, and proofreading. Students will practice research techniques including MLA documentation of print and electronic sources. The class will include review lessons of grammar, usage, and mechanics. Students will also develop vocabulary skills throughout the semester.

Journalism I (NCAA, RAI)
ENG215 or ENG216
(Elective 10-11-12) First OR Second Semester

A one-semester specialized writing class, this course includes news, feature, and opinion writing. Students will examine their world for its news potential, review basic writing competencies, experiment with a variety of journalistic writing styles, practice interviewing and library research methods, and acquaint themselves with the basics of prepress production. Several projects will be produced on the computer using software useful for yearbook and newspaper courses.

Also emphasized are press freedoms and responsibilities. The course is of value to anyone interested in expanding his or her skills in communications and is a prerequisite for Publications: Yearbook and Publications: Newspaper courses.

Publications: Newspaper
ENG309 and ENG310
(Elective 10-11-12) Full-Year Course
Prerequisite: Journalism I

A one- or two-semester course dealing with the practical application of journalistic skills. Students will assume reporting and photography positions on Spotlight, Valley’s student newspaper. They will assist in all aspects of producing the newspaper, from planning to pre-press production. Selected students will also assist in the business aspects of the publication, including advertising sales and record keeping. Students interested in assuming editorial positions on Spotlight are encouraged to take this course as early in their high school career as possible.

Publications: Yearbook
ENG311 and ENG312
(Elective 10-11-12) Full-Year Course
Prerequisite: Journalism I

Yearbook is offered as a one-semester course; however, it is recommended that students take the course for two semesters, beginning with the fall semester. The course applies fundamental language arts and journalism skills in producing the yearbook. Students will assume staff positions and be responsible for completing assignments according to a deadline schedule. Knowledge of a word processing program and the InDesign program will greatly benefit students taking this course for the first time. A working knowledge of computers is necessary since all copy is electronic submission and layouts are electronically-generated online. Students should be adept in language arts with good writing and communication skills.

General Courses and Other Courses Offering Special Help

Debate III (NCAA, RAI)
ENG605 and ENG606
(Elective 10-11-12) Full-Year Course
Prerequisite: Debate II

This yearlong course is designed to give the student the knowledge of advanced theories of logic and argumentation. Specific models of logic will be examined. Advanced research methods as well as specific testing of various forms of evidence will be utilized. Additional opportunities in the areas of original oratory, extemporaneous speaking, impromptu speaking and oral interpretation of literature will be provided. Students will prepare for presentations in Lincoln-Douglas, policy debate, public forum, and legislative debate. Students will use online research tools and subscription services such as Lexis-Nexis and JSTOR. A debate course is required for all debate team members, and all members of the class will participate on the debate team.

Debate IV (NCAA, RAI)
ENG607 and ENG608
(Elective 12) Full-Year Course
Prerequisite: Debate III

This full-year course is designed to allow students to undertake individual research projects as approved by the instructor. Advanced research techniques will be utilized and topics will be associated with the problem area being debated during that particular year in Lincoln-Douglas and policy debate. Students will be expected to research and analyze several critical national and international issues, both socially and politically in public forum and legislative debate. Research levels comparable to those required in entry-level college courses will be expected. Students will use online research tools and subscription services such as Lexis-Nexis and JSTOR. Advanced work in original oratory, extemporaneous speaking, impromptu speaking, and oral interpretation of literature may serve as an alternative to some research assignments. A debate course is required for all debate team members, and all members of the class will participate on the debate team.

English as a Second Language (EL)
ENG329 and ENG330 
(Elective 10-11-12) Full-Year Course

Non-English or limited English speaking students are enrolled in EL class after a period of evaluation by the ESL teacher. Program objectives are as follows:

  1. To teach students the skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing that will allow them to function in high school.
  2. To help students understand and participate in American cultural life.
  3. To assist students in learning to use English as a natural vehicle of communications.

English Learners Newcomer’s Program
ENG333 and ENG334 
(Elective 7-12)  Full-Year Course

As students enter the WDM School District with English as their second language, the TELPA test is administered. Students scoring a low proficient score on oral, written, and reading will be served within the Newcomer’s Program. Students may be eligible to participate in the program for two full semesters. After completing the Newcomer Program, students are served by the regular ESL teacher.

English Learners Reading
ENG335 or ENG336
(Elective 10-11-12) First OR Second Semester

Newcomer program graduates or those currently enrolled in an EL class. Additional EL instruction using content-based reading materials, as well as other types of reading materials, i.e. newspapers, magazine articles, non-fiction, and fiction materials. These reading materials help teach new vocabulary needed for comprehension and understanding for those students who are currently enrolled in other mainstream classes.

Film Appreciation and Analysis
ENG217 or ENG218
(Elective 10-11-12) First OR Second Semester

A course of study to enhance and broaden a student’s knowledge and appreciation of film techniques, production, genres, and themes by viewing, discussing, and writing about a variety of films from the classical Hollywood era to the contemporary era, including silent and black-and-white films. In-depth analysis will be expected.