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Family Reading Tips for Read Across America Day

March 2 is Read Across America Day in honor of beloved author Dr. Seuss’ birthday. March 4 is World Read Aloud Day. Even if you celebrate reading with your child every day, both days offer special opportunities to highlight the importance of reading. Here are some family reading tips, submitted by Julie DeMicco, Professional Development/Curriculum Facilitator for literacy and social studies with the West Des Moines Community Schools.

A collection of books that will to go to Pre-kindergarten families during conferences next week as a part of ongoing efforts to put books in the hands of children and their families at Crestview.

A collection of books that will to go to Pre-kindergarten families during conferences next week as a part of ongoing efforts to put books in the hands of children and their families at Crestview.

  • Create Lots of Opportunities to Read to and With Your Child!
    • Take your child to the library. Help him/her to get his/her own library card.
    • Bring along a book any time your child has to wait somewhere—doctor or dentist appointments, in the car, etc.
    • Read a recipe and cook something together.
    • Help your child to pick books that are the right reading level. Your child’s teacher can help with this.
    • Read bedtime stories! Make it special. Don’t work on reading at this time. Just enjoy each other and the books.
    • Read your child’s favorite books over and over. If your child likes books by a certain author, help him or her to find another.
Westridge Elementary held a school-wide Drop Everything and Read (DEAR) time today to honor Read Across America Day.

Westridge Elementary held a school-wide Drop Everything and Read (DEAR) time today to honor Read Across America Day.

  • Help Your Child Become a Happy, Confident Reader and Writer!
    • Create a comfortable reading space in your home.
    • Put books everywhere.
    • Create a toolbox or other space with drawing and writing materials for your child.
    • Let your child read and help write your grocery list.
    • Help your child write thank you cards.
    • Let your child see you reading.
    • Choose books that match your child’s likes and interests.
    • Tell family stories. Children love to hear stories about when their parents were little.
    • Be patient when your child is working on unknown words.
Several of our "Cat in the Hat" friends from Miss Amanda's preschool classroom at Jordan Creek Elementary.

Several of our “Cat in the Hat” friends from Miss Amanda’s preschool classroom at Jordan Creek Elementary.

  • Play with Letters, Words, and Sounds
    • Say silly songs, poems, rhymes, and tongue twisters together.
    • Read rhyming books.
    • Play sound games together, like Sound Detective. “Can you guess the word? m-o-p.”
    • Play flash card games with the new words your child is learning to read and write. This can help children automatically recognize and read words.
    • Use time spent in the car for word play.
Two students sharing a book during Westridge Elementary School's school-wide reading time.

Two students sharing a book during Westridge Elementary School’s school-wide reading time.

  • Check for Understanding
    • Ask questions before reading: “What do you think the book will be about?”
    • Ask questions while reading: “Where is the cat going?”
    • Make connections to your lives and to other books: “This book reminds me of that trip we took to Grandma’s house.” “This book reminds me of the other book about the bear that we read.”
    • Visualize the story: “Can you picture all the colors?”
    • Reflect on the book: “Did you like the book?”
  • Make reading the most attractive choice. Put books, magazines, and other reading materials everywhere. Limit screen time!
  • Make time for reading and writing activities EVERY DAY!

 

For more tips and strategies visit: