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Instructor Tips: Cindy Lin — Tackling Group Fitness Classes

CindyLin-CEblog

Cindy Lin, WERQ Dance Fitness instructor.

The March Instructor Tips are focused not on marching, but on dancing. Cindy Lin is a third-year podiatric medical student at Des Moines University. She is originally from Portland, Ore., and graduated from the University of Oregon in 2012. Lin first fell in love with fitness while taking Zumba classes with her mom in high school. She became a “group fitness junkie” in college, taking a wide variety of classes, from yoga to kickboxing. She started teach WERQ Dance Fitness classes in August 2013, and it has become her favorite way to work out. She loves teaching group fitness and challenging others to push themselves to their full potential during workouts. Lin is teaching a WERQ Dance Fitness class starting March 25. She can be found on Facebook and Pinterest.

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Five Tips on Group Fitness from Cindy Lin

  1. Go into the class with an open mind and a smile. Those who come in with no expectations tend to have the best experience. Give different classes a chance; you might be surprised by which ones you like.
  2. Try each class three times. For dance fitness, the first class is getting used to the class, and the second class is about learning the choreography. By class three, things are more familiar, and students can bring out their inner Beyonces. Once they are more familiar with the choreography, it is easier to add flair and have more fun. If you still aren’t a fan by that point, it’s okay — not every class is a good fit for every person.
  3. Get to class in time for the warm-up. WERQ Dance Fitness is different than other dance fitness classes because it utilizes the warm-up to ease students into the workout and previews dance moves that come up later in the class. Gradually easing into the workout helps prevents injury, and the previewed dance moves make it easier to master the choreography later.
  4. Do not worry about what you look like to others. Most people are too focused on watching the instructor and learning the moves to pay attention to anyone around them. Remember to focus on yourself during a workout — the workout is about you.
  5. A workout is what you make of it. Fitness instructors are there to guide the workout and provide external motivation. Students who feel sore and tired can make the workout a little lower intensity. To get their heart rate up, a student can add more intention to their movements — jump higher, dance bigger, and squat lower. Each student is in total control of their body and workout.